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Old 03-05-13, 06:57 PM
New Study: Is Muscle Fatigue All in Your Head?
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When you hit a wall at the end of a long run, don’t just blame your diet or training regimen. Your brain and neurons also play a surprising role, says new research.

If you train long and hard enough, eventually you may hit a wall—the point when your muscles no longer work at peak performance, even though you still have more to give. But is running out of steam a product of a lack of energy (aka glycogen stores), or is something more at work?

Scientists have known about this kind of muscle fatigue—also known as “central fatigue”—for about 80 years, but a new study out of Denmark, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, sheds some light on what might prevent your muscles from working hard even when they have energy available.

It’s been long understood that when you exercise, your body releases serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that acts like an accelerator to speed up the contraction of muscles. What the new research has uncovered, however, is that at higher levels, serotonin may become the opposite—a brake that slows down the firing of your neurons and keeps your muscles from overworking.

This research follows a 2011 study, from the journal Brain Research, that found that visual clues can play a role in muscle fatigue. Participants were asked to squeeze a ball until their hand became tired. In the second round, researchers used an optical illusion to fool them into thinking the hand was at rest. This time, their brain continued to send strong signals to the muscle to contract.

Will this new research into your brain's role in fatigue help you get past the wall? Not right now—but it does get us one step closer to understanding why muscles tire and what keeps them going. And researchers also hope it can help combat doping. “It is crucial to identify which methods athletes can use to prevent central fatigue and thereby continue to perform beyond what is naturally possible,” study author Jean-Francois Perrier said in a release.

How the Brain Plays a Role in Muscle Fatigue and Increasing Stamina - Men's Fitness
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Old 03-07-13, 01:19 PM
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Thats Crazy...based on that if you can duplicate the "at rest" you could continue for an undertemined amount of time. Imagine the shit ya could do like that...crazy!!
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Old 03-07-13, 01:32 PM
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You know it's true, being an elite soldier.

I've never served, but from everything I've seen, a good portion of sof training, whether it is Ranger school, BUD/S, recon marine training or whatever involves mind over matter stuff.
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Old 03-07-13, 01:35 PM
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You know it's true, being an elite soldier.

I've never served, but from everything I've seen, a good portion of sof training, whether it is Ranger school, BUD/S, recon marine training or whatever involves mind over matter stuff.
Jogging every day doesn't break down muscle per.session like heavy intense weight lifting though
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Old 03-07-13, 01:36 PM
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Jogging every day doesn't break down muscle per.session like heavy intense weight lifting though
What?
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Old 03-07-13, 01:41 PM
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What?
Given this is a bbing site I'm just saying that the the above logic doesn't neccassarily carry over to weight lifting.
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Old 03-07-13, 01:47 PM
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I belive in that 100%
I have said before here my body is programeged for 12 reps. I always seem to get fatiguged at 12 reps. example I do 12 reps just body weight on dips somereason I get tired and maybe make 14. very next set or even 3 sets later I can strap on 45 or even 90 pounds and do the same 12 reps

I also notice it in my bench (incline Dbels) the 90s get extreamly heavy at 12 reps but 2 sets later I get the 100-120s for 12

I know this is all in my mind I have posted about it before here
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Old 03-07-13, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by ROCKETW19 View Post
I belive in that 100%
I have said before here my body is programeged for 12 reps. I always seem to get fatiguged at 12 reps. example I do 12 reps just body weight on dips somereason I get tired and maybe make 14. very next set or even 3 sets later I can strap on 45 or even 90 pounds and do the same 12 reps

I also notice it in my bench (incline Dbels) the 90s get extreamly heavy at 12 reps but 2 sets later I get the 100-120s for 12

I know this is all in my mind I have posted about it before here
Much of that is subconscious control of time under tension, if I said get 14 not 12 you would explode faster and drop down quicker to lessen the time under tension and get the extra two.

Are the incline dumbells your second excercise by chance (not your first)?
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Old 03-19-13, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by THE BOUNCER View Post
When you hit a wall at the end of a long run, don’t just blame your diet or training regimen. Your brain and neurons also play a surprising role, says new research.

If you train long and hard enough, eventually you may hit a wall—the point when your muscles no longer work at peak performance, even though you still have more to give. But is running out of steam a product of a lack of energy (aka glycogen stores), or is something more at work?

Scientists have known about this kind of muscle fatigue—also known as “central fatigue”—for about 80 years, but a new study out of Denmark, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, sheds some light on what might prevent your muscles from working hard even when they have energy available.

It’s been long understood that when you exercise, your body releases serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the brain that acts like an accelerator to speed up the contraction of muscles. What the new research has uncovered, however, is that at higher levels, serotonin may become the opposite—a brake that slows down the firing of your neurons and keeps your muscles from overworking.

This research follows a 2011 study, from the journal Brain Research, that found that visual clues can play a role in muscle fatigue. Participants were asked to squeeze a ball until their hand became tired. In the second round, researchers used an optical illusion to fool them into thinking the hand was at rest. This time, their brain continued to send strong signals to the muscle to contract.

Will this new research into your brain's role in fatigue help you get past the wall? Not right now—but it does get us one step closer to understanding why muscles tire and what keeps them going. And researchers also hope it can help combat doping. “It is crucial to identify which methods athletes can use to prevent central fatigue and thereby continue to perform beyond what is naturally possible,” study author Jean-Francois Perrier said in a release.

How the Brain Plays a Role in Muscle Fatigue and Increasing Stamina - Men's Fitness
Interesting theory.
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Old 05-23-13, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Antonio View Post
I have said before here my human is programed for 12 repetitions. I always seem to get fatigued at 12 repetitions. example I do 12 repetitions just body weight on falls some reason I get exhausted and maybe create 14. very next set or even 3 places later I can band on 45 or even 90 body weight and do the same 12 reps.............
wtf you are def not real. you said in a really weird way the same exact thing I said along time ago. there is no way"you said before here" you only have 2 posts,lol

if this is a bot wow things are way more advanced than I even thought.
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Old 05-23-13, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Mr incredible View Post
Much of that is subconscious control of time under tension, if I said get 14 not 12 you would explode faster and drop down quicker to lessen the time under tension and get the extra two.

Are the incline dumbells your second excercise by chance (not your first)?
I must of missed this last time bro. that makes some sence. I will try and pay attention on time under stress and see if I move faster when going heavyer.
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