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Old 07-22-16, 09:23 AM
Lifting Lighter Weights Can Be Just as Effective as Heavy Ones
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Funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and published this month in the Journal of Applied Physiology, he and his colleagues recruited 49 young men who had been weight training for a year or more. (The scientists plan to study women and older people in future studies.)

All completed tests of strength, fitness, hormone levels and muscular health, then were randomly divided into two groups.


Lifting Lighter Weights Can Be Just as Effective as Heavy Ones - NYTimes.com
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Old 07-22-16, 10:29 AM
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I wonder if a test like this on a group so small really tells the tale so to speak.
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Old 07-22-16, 10:30 AM
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I think it depends on what your definition of "just as effective" means. Sure lifting any kind of weights is going to be more effective compared to doing nothing at all. I think this article is more in reference to the general public. But if your goal is to be jacked I don't think there is really anyway to get around using heavy weights. Imagine Dorian or Ronnie if they had trained with 1/4th the amount of weight they actually used. In Ronnie case he'd probably be much healthier but i doubt we'd have ever heard of him.



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Old 07-22-16, 10:24 PM
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"...One group was assigned to follow the standard regimen, in which weights were set at between 75 and 90 percent of the man’s one-repetition maximum and the volunteer lifted until he could not lift again, usually after about 10 repetitions.

The other volunteers began the lighter routine. Their weights were set at between 30 and 50 percent of each man’s one-repetition maximum, and he lifted them as many as 25 times, until the muscles were exhausted..."


So in theory, 100lbs ten times or 10lbs one hundred times, the amount of work is the same. They claim strength, size and hormone levels were the same between both groups.

At some point though as the body adapts, if you're not increasing weight you'll need to increase reps to a point that is neither convenient nor realistic. Workouts would literally take all day.
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Old 07-23-16, 12:13 PM
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"...One group was assigned to follow the standard regimen, in which weights were set at between 75 and 90 percent of the manís one-repetition maximum and the volunteer lifted until he could not lift again, usually after about 10 repetitions.

The other volunteers began the lighter routine. Their weights were set at between 30 and 50 percent of each manís one-repetition maximum, and he lifted them as many as 25 times, until the muscles were exhausted..."


So in theory, 100lbs ten times or 10lbs one hundred times, the amount of work is the same. They claim strength, size and hormone levels were the same between both groups.

At some point though as the body adapts, if you're not increasing weight you'll need to increase reps to a point that is neither convenient nor realistic. Workouts would literally take all day.
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Old 08-10-16, 06:23 PM
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I finally got a chance to read this study. Now I'm wondering if the concept of lifting heavy to get big is possibly just bro science? From the study:

Quote:
The results were unequivocal. There were no significant differences between the two groups. All of the men had gained muscle strength and size, and these gains were almost identical, whether they had lifted heavy or light weights.

Instead, the key to getting stronger for these men, Dr. Phillips and his colleagues decided, was to grow tired. The volunteers in both groups had to attain almost total muscular fatigue in order to increase their muscles’ size and strength.
Anyone here ever tried taking AAS and doing nothing but light weight higher rep workouts to exhaustion? Like for at least 6 months? Looks like whether it's 3 sets of 5 reps to exhaustion or 3 sets of 20 reps to exhaustion the muscles will still grow equally.
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Old 08-10-16, 10:21 PM
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I finally got a chance to read this study. Now I'm wondering if the concept of lifting heavy to get big is possibly just bro science? From the study:



Anyone here ever tried taking AAS and doing nothing but light weight higher rep workouts to exhaustion? Like for at least 6 months? Looks like whether it's 3 sets of 5 reps to exhaustion or 3 sets of 20 reps to exhaustion the muscles will still grow equally.


That's all I do. I have done over a thousand reps in a workout for five six weeks straight. And my normal routines are never less than 20 reps.
And I have my shit together I look pretty damn good. Despite of what bouncer says.
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Old 08-11-16, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by decadecadeca View Post
"...One group was assigned to follow the standard regimen, in which weights were set at between 75 and 90 percent of the man’s one-repetition maximum and the volunteer lifted until he could not lift again, usually after about 10 repetitions.

The other volunteers began the lighter routine. Their weights were set at between 30 and 50 percent of each man’s one-repetition maximum, and he lifted them as many as 25 times, until the muscles were exhausted..."


So in theory, 100lbs ten times or 10lbs one hundred times, the amount of work is the same. They claim strength, size and hormone levels were the same between both groups.

At some point though as the body adapts, if you're not increasing weight you'll need to increase reps to a point that is neither convenient nor realistic. Workouts would literally take all day.
great post.

i'll also say that there has to be some sort of limit. for example I don't think shoulder pressing 8lb dumbbells for 100 reps will yield the same results as 80lb dumbbells for 10 reps. same total weight at the end of the sets but different results IMO. You'll end up with an "endurance look". You guys really think Big Ramy would be that size if he lifted fisher price weights all day long? fuck no.
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Old 08-11-16, 09:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M00chie69 View Post
I finally got a chance to read this study. Now I'm wondering if the concept of lifting heavy to get big is possibly just bro science? From the study:



Anyone here ever tried taking AAS and doing nothing but light weight higher rep workouts to exhaustion? Like for at least 6 months? Looks like whether it's 3 sets of 5 reps to exhaustion or 3 sets of 20 reps to exhaustion the muscles will still grow equally.
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That's all I do. I have done over a thousand reps in a workout for five six weeks straight. And my normal routines are never less than 20 reps.
And I have my shit together I look pretty damn good. Despite of what bouncer says.
tell ya what. since I'm just about to be getting back into the gym in the next few weeks after almost 8 weeks off from my injury I'll give this a fair try since I'll pretty much be forced not to go heavy at least at first. I'm on test, deca, and GH so I figure I'm the perfect candidate for it especially at this particular time.
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Old 08-11-16, 11:52 AM
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tell ya what. since I'm just about to be getting back into the gym in the next few weeks after almost 8 weeks off from my injury I'll give this a fair try since I'll pretty much be forced not to go heavy at least at first. I'm on test, deca, and GH so I figure I'm the perfect candidate for it especially at this particular time.


Maybe I'll drive up there one of these days and give you some beginner points and fix some of forms and stuff.
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Old 08-11-16, 07:35 PM
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tell ya what. since I'm just about to be getting back into the gym in the next few weeks after almost 8 weeks off from my injury I'll give this a fair try since I'll pretty much be forced not to go heavy at least at first. I'm on test, deca, and GH so I figure I'm the perfect candidate for it especially at this particular time.
Subscribed. Just find weight you can do for 15 reps. That 15th rep should be difficult. As you progress you can increase the weight, but with that many reps it would still be considered light weight I would think.

If it works the same as lifting hella heavy, or if it's even close, then this could be ground-breaking. Building muscles just the same without destroying the joints.
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Old 08-11-16, 09:32 PM
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tell ya what. since I'm just about to be getting back into the gym in the next few weeks after almost 8 weeks off from my injury I'll give this a fair try since I'll pretty much be forced not to go heavy at least at first. I'm on test, deca, and GH so I figure I'm the perfect candidate for it especially at this particular time.
When are you planning to hit the gym?

I can't believe this much time has passed.
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Old 08-12-16, 09:34 AM
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When are you planning to hit the gym?

I can't believe this much time has passed.
He's scared to workout again. He'll just pass out in the gym parking lot
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Old 08-12-16, 11:05 AM
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Subscribed. Just find weight you can do for 15 reps. That 15th rep should be difficult. As you progress you can increase the weight, but with that many reps it would still be considered light weight I would think.

If it works the same as lifting hella heavy, or if it's even close, then this could be ground-breaking. Building muscles just the same without destroying the joints.
Anything will probably work after 8 weeks I'm gonna see quick progress for a bit but I'll stick with it for at least a few months mainly to ease into it and prevent further injury.

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When are you planning to hit the gym?

I can't believe this much time has passed.
It's been 6 weeks. I'll be returning in next week or 2 as soon as I don't feel any pain in my shoulders. Last thing I want to do is prolong an injury by not letting it fully heal. i don't think you realize how bad I was for the first few weeks. I guess I fell really hard and put my shoulders in an awkward position when it happened. I'm lucky nothing broke or tore but god damn it sure felt like it for the first few weeks.

In all honesty I was so over-trained, I wasn't sleeping, my muscles were all in knots, and I just kept pushing and pushing. I really needed this break. It's hard mentally sometimes but i'm sure I'll be better off for it.
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Old 08-12-16, 01:10 PM
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In all honesty I was so over-trained, I wasn't sleeping, my muscles were all in knots, and I just kept pushing and pushing. I really needed this break. It's hard mentally sometimes but i'm sure I'll be better off for it.
I've always trained pretty heavily over the past 15 or so years of my life. Never taking more than a week or two off at a time. Back in 2013 I started a new business and moved to a new state and I just had to focus on building that business. I didn't step foot in a gym for the entire year. All of 2013 I was out of the gym. I still did some bodyweight workouts and lots of stretching, but man I can tell you even with the stress of starting that business, I never slept better and never felt more at peace. I had no pain in my muscles, no knots, no tightness, no joint issues. Granted, I went from 220lbs down to 185lbs, but most people told me I looked better/younger and less bloated. It was kind of an eye opening experience to me on how much training affects our bodies and our lives, especially sleep. Training is a stress and for the most part stress is bad for our nervous system.

Of course I'm lifting again and back up to 205 at the moment.
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Old 08-12-16, 01:23 PM
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I think you benefit from both (heavy and light). For me, the key is feeling the movement instead of just completing the lift. For instance, BB Rows, I can pile the weight on and complete the lift with decent form, but I feel a greater pump in my back when I lighten the weight and focus on contraction. I also took a different approach with shoulders. I stopped going real heavy and focused on higher reps. Yeah, I could barely handle the pump.

Some lifts, however, I like heavier weight like deadlifts. I'm not a fan of high rep deads because my form gets sloppy and then my lower back starts yelling at me. I also like cycling my chest work. I'll go heavy barbell to maintain strength for a few weeks, then go back to db presses for growth.

Triceps - I'm currently experimenting lower reps/heavier weight. I've always done 10-15 reps. We'll see if anything different happens.

Biceps - Lighter weight higher reps all the time for me. Anything too heavy and I feel like my delts take over.

For legs, fuck man anything pumps the fuck out of them as long as you work hard.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 08-12-16, 01:34 PM
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Great input wheyman.

For chest I love going heavy at the beginning and then doing a series of burnout sets and multiple dropsets until failure. Have your chest begging you to stop

For back, I mix it between high and low reps. With BB rows the greatest pumps are felt at 135 for 20 reps (5 sets). Have your forearms give out before your back.

For shoulders, I'm always doing supersets lateral and rear delts. Mix it between high and low reps. Generally I start heavy and by the end of the workout more repetition with supersets

For arms and legs and nothing but volume. High rep moderate weight. Focus on contraction and squeezing.
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Old 08-12-16, 03:12 PM
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I've always trained pretty heavily over the past 15 or so years of my life. Never taking more than a week or two off at a time. Back in 2013 I started a new business and moved to a new state and I just had to focus on building that business. I didn't step foot in a gym for the entire year. All of 2013 I was out of the gym. I still did some bodyweight workouts and lots of stretching, but man I can tell you even with the stress of starting that business, I never slept better and never felt more at peace. I had no pain in my muscles, no knots, no tightness, no joint issues. Granted, I went from 220lbs down to 185lbs, but most people told me I looked better/younger and less bloated. It was kind of an eye opening experience to me on how much training affects our bodies and our lives, especially sleep. Training is a stress and for the most part stress is bad for our nervous system.

Of course I'm lifting again and back up to 205 at the moment.
That's what I think has effected me the most. I think I really overwhelmed my nervous system with my relentless never give up attitude towards the gym.

I got to the point where I could not relax ever. No matter how physically exhausted I was I was sitting there tense and tight almost gritting my teeth. My muscles especially rhomboid, traps, and scapula area were just always screaming.
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Old 08-13-16, 05:28 AM
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Anything will probably work after 8 weeks I'm gonna see quick progress for a bit but I'll stick with it for at least a few months mainly to ease into it and prevent further injury.



It's been 6 weeks. I'll be returning in next week or 2 as soon as I don't feel any pain in my shoulders. Last thing I want to do is prolong an injury by not letting it fully heal. i don't think you realize how bad I was for the first few weeks. I guess I fell really hard and put my shoulders in an awkward position when it happened. I'm lucky nothing broke or tore but god damn it sure felt like it for the first few weeks.

In all honesty I was so over-trained, I wasn't sleeping, my muscles were all in knots, and I just kept pushing and pushing. I really needed this break. It's hard mentally sometimes but i'm sure I'll be better off for it.
I think I have grasped how bad it was/is from your posts. You stated that the other day was the first time you have been able to get ready without help, I'd say that your injuries were pretty fucking bad. Glad to see you healing. Just can't believ it has already been 6 weeks. Sounds like your CNS was severely taxed. This break, while painful, is most likely long overdue. Good luck with the continued recovery.
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Old 08-13-16, 09:24 AM
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I think I have grasped how bad it was/is from your posts. You stated that the other day was the first time you have been able to get ready without help, I'd say that your injuries were pretty fucking bad. Glad to see you healing. Just can't believ it has already been 6 weeks. Sounds like your CNS was severely taxed. This break, while painful, is most likely long overdue. Good luck with the continued recovery.
thanks bro. scary thing is, i would have never taken a break, i had to literally be forced by something like this which in the scheme of things could have been much worse. the first 4 weeks off was really tough both mentally and physically but the last few weeks as I start to feel better has changed my view on things a bit.

Working hard and being consistent when you have a particular goal can be a great thing but it can also fog your mind and judgment.

Here I was, hardly able to sleep, muscles in knots, always in fight or flight mode and in general just feeling beat the hell up. But all I could see in my mind was that goal of bigger and leaner. I ignored all the warning signs and instead of relaxing a bit I added in more drugs (dbol and drol) which only served to amplify my already maxed out CNS.

Moving forward I still have the same goals. I still want to be bigger and leaner but I now know that you can only ignore the warning signs for so long before something bad happens. I will no longer ignore the warning signs.

Hell, I may take an 8 week break every year from now on. Thinking about levrone here. Guy was known to take months off. Maybe that's in part why he's still looking amazing at 52 while Ronnie is 75% crippled. Maybe those few months is exactly what the joints, ligaments, and tendons need especially for those of us on AAS.
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