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  • Interesting Facts, Thoughts, and Ideas


    Within the next 50 years, Facebook could feel more like a place for the dead than the living. According to academics from the University of Oxford, by 2069, the dead could outnumber the living on the social network.

    The number of dead users on Facebook is growing at an unstoppable rate. In 2012, eight years after the platform launched, 30 million users had died.

    Today, it has over two billion users and an estimation of 8000 users die every day. Based onFacebook’s user statistics in 2018, researchers have predicted the number of dead users could reach at least 1.4 billion or potentially as high as 4.9 billion by the end of the century.

  • #2
    One in Seven Homes in Japan Is Empty … A record 8.46 million Japanese homes are sitting vacant as builders keep adding stock in a country where the population is shrinking.

    The number jumped by 260,000 in a twice-a-decade survey released by the government on Friday, reaching 13.6 percent of housing, the Nikkei Asian Review reported.

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    • #3
      Since the intelligence test was invented more than 100 years ago, our IQ scores have been steadily increasing. Even the average person today would have been considered a genius compared to someone born in 1919 – a phenomenon known as the Flynn effect.

      We may have to enjoy it while we can. The most recent evidence suggests that this trend may now be slowing. It may even be reversing, meaning that we have already passed the summit of human intellectual potential.

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      • #4
        The total number of births in China last year dropped by 2 million from 2017, the National Bureau of Statistics announced at a news conference on Monday.

        The massive drop — from 17.23 million to 15.23 million — indicates that China’s birth rate last year was the lowest the country has seen since famine-stricken 1961.

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        • #5
          Fifty years ago, the four most valuable U.S. companies employed an average of 430,000 people with an average market cap of $180 billion.These days, the largest U.S. companies have about 2X the market cap of their 1964 counterparts with one-fourth of the employees.

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          • #6

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bouncer View Post
              Since the intelligence test was invented more than 100 years ago, our IQ scores have been steadily increasing. Even the average person today would have been considered a genius compared to someone born in 1919 – a phenomenon known as the Flynn effect.

              We may have to enjoy it while we can. The most recent evidence suggests that this trend may now be slowing. It may even be reversing, meaning that we have already passed the summit of human intellectual potential.
              I believe that. Flat earthers, anti vaxxers run amok fuckin up hundreds of years of progress.

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              • #8
                Deaths from cancer dropped 27% over a quarter century, meaning an estimated 2.6 million fewer people died of the disease during that period, according to a new report from researchers at the American Cancer Society.

                For most of the 20th century, overall cancer deaths rose, driven mainly by men dying from lung cancer, researchers noted. But since the peak in 1991, the death rate has steadily dropped 1.5% a year through 2016, primarily because of long-running efforts to reduce smoking, as well as advances in detection and treatment of cancer at earlier stages, when prognosis for recovery is generally better.

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                • #9
                  the world economy

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                  • #10
                    huge disconnect between generations...

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                    Percent of Americans 65+ years of age who often get news from TV: 86%

                    Percent of Americans 18-29 years of age who often get news from TV: 20%

                    Percent of Americans 65+ years of age who often get news from a print newspaper: 46%

                    Percent of Americans 18-29 years of age who often get news from a print newspaper: 2%

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                    • #11

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                      • #12
                        Analyst comments when the iPod was released Oct 2001

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                        "Clearly Apple is following Sony’s lead by integrating consumer electronics devices into its marketing strategy, but Apple lacks the richness of Sony’s product offering. And introducing new consumer products right now is risky, especially if they cannot be priced attractively."

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                        • #13
                          Immigrants who come to the U.S. are significantly less likely than U.S.-born individuals to have mental health problems, according to a new study published inPsychiatry Research. Using the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and face-to-face interviews, the study surveyed over 36,000 immigrants and revealed the counterintuitive finding that immigrants are less likely to experience anxiety, bipolar, depressive, and trauma-related disorders.

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                          • #14
                            According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 80 percent of adults and about one-third of children now meet the clinical definition of overweight or obese. More Americans live with “extreme obesity“ than with breast cancer, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and HIV put together.

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                            • #15
                              New data show younger couples are approaching relationships very differently from baby boomers, who married young, divorced, remarried and so on. Generation X and especially millennials are being pickier about who they marry, tying the knot at older ages when education, careers and finances are on track. The result is a U.S. divorce rate that dropped 18 percent from 2008 to 2016, according to an analysis by University of Maryland sociology professor Philip Cohen.

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